Dillon-Silverthorne Hiking

The surrounding mountains of the Dillon/Silverthorne area provide endless opportunities for hiking with stunning views of mountaintops, rivers, lakes, wildflowers, aspen groves, waterfalls and wildlife. When entering the backcountry in the summer and fall, it is important to start early, bring layers and a rain jacket, and bring plenty of water and snacks. Afternoon thunderstorms are very likely in the high country, so it is a rule of thumb to be down by 2pm. The sun is much stronger at altitude and the weather can change frequently and in an instant so it is key to bring extra layers for protection, including a hat, sunglasses and gloves. Pack extra water and snacks because you dehydrate faster and hiking can be tiresome. 

Easy 

Old Dillon Reservoir Trailhead

This 1.7 mile moderately trafficked loop trail located near Dillon has spectacular views of the mountains of the Tenmile Range and the Continental Divide. The Old Dillon Reservoir was built in the 1930’s to supply water to the original town of Dillon, which is now covered by the new Dillon Reservoir. Water is supplied to the old reservoir via a diversion ditch from Salt Lick Creek, north of I-70. 

Lily Pad Lake Trail

Lily Pad Lake Trail is a 3.3 mile heavily trafficked out and back trail located near Silverthorne, Colorado that features a lake and is good for all skill levels. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.

Moderate 

Salt Lick Trail

Salt Lick Trail is a 5.1 mile moderately trafficked out and back trail located near Silverthorne, Colorado that features a river and is rated as moderate. The trail offers a number of activity options and is best used from April until September. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.

Difficult

Willow Creek / Salmon Lake Trail

This 16.6 mile lightly trafficked out and back trail located near Silverthorne features a lake and is rated as difficult. The trail is primarily used for hiking, camping, and horses and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash.